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20130121
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for our economy. so important for our public safety. so important for emergency response as we witnessed here in the northeast of the country. and so, while the fight was long and at times, unnecessary, at least the vote was taken today and we move forward. mr. garamendi: thank you, mr. tonko. the bill now is out of this house. it's already in the senate. we expect the senate to pass it probably tomorrow or the next day. certainly before the inaugural on monday and then the president will sign it shortly thereafter. bringing that kind of relief. you mentioned the jobs issue and people need to go to work. when we have these natural disasters and we come forward with the kind of support that we have seen today and will soon be available for new jersey, new york, connecticut and the surrounding areas, people go back to work. those people that have received immediate fema support for housing, for clothing, for food, that money is immediately spent into the economy. on the infrastructure side, it's crucial when the subways of lower manhattan flooded, the world's financial institution took a w
' medical facilities, and help keep the economy moving by funding necessary repairs, small business loans, and recovery aid for businesses of all sizes. my committee thoroughly examined the emergency request, listened to the needs of the people and the region, and assessed the most pressing needs to determine the funding levels paid in this bill. we crafted this legislation responsibly, giving the administration's request and the senate passed bill a hard scrub to eliminate unnecessary spending. we have removed objectionable provisions added by the senate and have adjusted funding levels to make the best use of taxpayer dollars. as we know, we face precarious fiscal times and it's essential that congress make responsible decisions to ensure efficient and effective spending. taking cues from previous efforts we have included important oversight measures to prevent abuse and ensure that federal agencies are using these funds effectively and appropriately. this is not the first major natural disaster nor unfortunately will it be the last. one of the great attributes of the american people ha
'll turn to the economy now. a new warning about the united states and our credit rating as the debt battle kicks into high gear. congress has just weeks to increase our debt ceiling. fitch, a leading credit ratings agency, says a repeat of the 2011 debt limit crisis would spark a formal review of our country's aaa rating. that could mean a downgrade by them. now you might remember, s&p, a different agency, already downgraded our country in 2011. that was the first time in our history that that happened. the president is taking a hard-line stand, issuing a warning of his own to the gop. >> we have to pay our bills. congress has two choices here. we can act responsibly and pay america's bills. or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. jenna: republicans like congressman jason chaffetz blasting back against the president. >> i think the president was terribly irresponsible today. to say he will not talk about it because he is above it, but blame all of congress, in part c
in an effort to fight lower enrollment rates due to the bad economy. is this trend going to continue? joining us to talk about it is university maryland economist peter morris se789. half of the declines, why are more young are deciding to forgo college education? >> the cost have jumped a lot and the graduates can't find jobs. there is a sense that it doesn't pay out. you get set with a lot of big loans and join the service, learn a trade. go to a community college and skip university all together. >> gregg: president obama wants everybody to go to college? >> it doesn't pay out. most stated universities offer diplomas that don't lead to a marketable skill. there are too many graduates working at starbucks these days. >> gregg: "wall street journal" analyzed this way. take a look at this. facing stagnant family income, shaky job prospects and a smaller pool of high school graduates, more schools are reining in tuition costs. is it possible that some tuition costs may actually go down, or we simply talking about slowing the rate of increase? >> i think it's slowing the rate of increase. it's
that healthy ecosystems also can mean healthy economies. from louisiana, what we have taken -- what we believe is a very good first effort the addressing the vulnerabilities that exist in reducing that risk is with the state's matter of fact plan which is a long- term plan to reduce the economic significance and reduce the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve protection for all coastal communities. it is that resource that is important. the states provide and the gulf provides to the nation, it if it is going to be afforded through the nation. we believe with this plan we can have sustainable healthy ecosystems but also healthy communities. there's an essence of -- there is a form of social engineering because if you can't ensure the communities, the supermarket, the schools, the things that the communities depend on, the communities will not survive. we want to make sure we will develop a healthy system but also healthy communities that can provide those resources. we have come a long way, it is not perfect but we have a plan to achieve this sustainability and protecting the commu
increase -- once you get economies of scale going it will increase the cost of the gun ten to 20%. >> i work here at the school for public health. i just had a comment about the large capacity magazines. i was in a discussion with some friends of mine who are law abiding gun enthusiasts about the large capacity magazines and they said you can ban the 40 round magazines, but they said if i wanted to kill a lot of people i could just have 310 round magazines i could pop onto my weapon. i saw some of the logic of what they were saying to the i guess my comment and my question would be it's a little hard for me to feel like we can make reasonable decent progress in reducing gun deaths when we live in a country where someone so many people think it is fair the constitutionally given right to own a machine that fires projectiles designed to kill large numbers of people. how are we going to make qualitative progress when we have so many people in such a large lobbying industry for the gun manufacturers that support that idea? thank you. >> a fi in the first comment. we are already making progr
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>steve: welcome back. the welfare state is growing and sadly on so many levels no sign of it slowing down. >>gretchen: that according to a new chart released by republicans on two senate budget committees. according to dana colmes, federal welfare spending expected to skyrocket 80 % over the next decade. stew varney is here. how did he come up with that calculation? >> that is government numbers used by republican members of the senate budget committee. it represents a whole new america. in fact, it represents a total reversal from the days of welfare reform in the mid-1990's. welfare has made an enormous come-back. there are no plans to rein it in. it is going to go up by $11 trillion. spending on welfare up $11 trillion
the economy of louisiana expand, and basically progress. >> he's saying if you make louisiana a great place to come, companies will come. >> yes. >> peter: and people will have work? >> yes. >> peter: but the trade-off is, higher sales tax. so the question today is, that a regresssive tax? >> yes. >> peter: as you economists say? >> yes. >> peter: what does that mean? >> everybody pays it. no relation to how much you earn. it's how much you spend. you pay tax according to what you spend. a sales tax, it tax consumption. so in that sense, yes. it is regresssive. but on the other hand, if the absence of income taxes creates a growing economy, everybody wins from that. >> peter: some states don't have income tax. >> there are seven. i'll read them, alaska, florida, nevada, south dakota, texas, washington, and wyoming. on the map. these states have no income taxes at the state level. louisiana wants to become the eighth state and north carolina, may become the ninth state. even oklahoma, they, too, are considering getting rid of personal income taxes at the state level. >> peter: these are in s
, it's critically important and timely. >> the greatest challenge the american economy has is the american congress. >> you know, it is. it really is, if you look at what's happening out there. and i've been saying this. and you guys have been saying it, too. because you go out and you talk to americans and they're discouraged by what's going on. and you say, wait a second. guys, we're in a century right now with the most technologically advanced country with the greatest universities, the greatest schools, we're going to win. >> that's right. >> even the chinese say america has eight out of the top ten universities on the planet. as you said, we've got energy. and you know this better than anybody else. there have been surveys. you ask chinese students what their biggest complaint about their education is, and they go, that our teachers don't teach us how to think like americans. >> that's right. >> they're crazy, those americans, and we want to have some of that. and you talk about -- you talk about this energy revolution, and americans need to hear this. >> it's right th
or to radically, giving too much money into many loans purses to few. banks are important part of the economy and the finance new job growth and the ability of people to buy a home, which is the largest single investment that they will make. we really need for them to be there to help the consumers and businesses finance their operations. the balancing act is not being too strict so that they will draw in and not land but not being too lax. that is a fine line. we shall we shallthe cfpb has achieve that with these rules. financial institutions will complain about any regulation because they did not want to be subject to kinds of rules that instruct them in how to do their business. when you read the complaints from the financial industry, i would say we have to take some of those with a grain of salt. host: gretchen morgenson is the "the new york times" assistant business and financial editor. she was co-author of "reckless endangerment.' guest: who basically were the interco parties in creating the crisis decades later. host: don is next from clifton, virginia. caller: a good time to segue t
. and then the president says he's not negotiating on the debt ceiling. what does that mean for our economy? senator rob portman says he's got an idea and alternative. that senator up next. here he comes. >>gretchen: welcome back. how big of a threat is our national debt? one theme from the hbo film "too big to fail" spells out the risks pretty clearly. watch it. >> the threats from russia, they suggest we coordinate and without warning dump hundreds of billions of if fannie's and freddie's bonds on to the market. the amount of debt your country carries is a terrible vulnerability. >>gretchen: a terrible vulnerability. senator rob portman couldn't agree more. he's a member of the senate finance committee and former budget director for george w. bush. good morning to you, senator. when we hear this vulnerability, you agree with that; right? >> absolutely. the president yesterday said we need to raise the debt limit because we have to pay our bills. we're at historic levels, $130,000 per family right now, over $16.5 trillion. yes, we need to raise the debt limit at some point but we have to do it in the c
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12